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How to Create A Positive Work Environment

how to create a positive work environment
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6 min read

 

Andriea DeniseBy Andriea Denise

 

The times when management can treat employees with disrespect and make them feel afraid and stressed is over. More people are rightfully becoming aware of their worth and are boldly taking their talents elsewhere.

Employees have always been the majority, but they haven’t always known their power. Now, millennials have entered the job market, and they will have their way or naught. More people are seeking positions in companies where the workload is reasonable, the environment is positive, and the hours are flexible.

In the 1980s, such demands were unheard of. Employees were just grateful to have a source of income. They showed up to work when they were told, did what they were told, ate lunch when they were told, and worked overtime whenever they were summoned. They also just accepted the pay they were given.

Today, employees show up to interviews with their credentials evaluating the company and assessing its fit into their lives. They demand their salaries, and they are not afraid of walking away if their needs aren’t met.

Before we dive into what owners and employers can do to create a positive work environment, let’s discuss the issues employees face every day.

 

The Meaning Behind Employee Plight

When people say they hate their job, what they’re really saying is that they are uncomfortable with one of the following:

1. Their pay

Most employees, besides some high level executives, are not completely happy with their compensation packages. Either they feel that the pay is too low, or the benefits they’re receiving are inadequate. Whatever the case, They feel that they deserve more than what they are currently receiving. Keep in mind, when most people give a salary amount, they might not be thinking about what their paychecks will be after taxes and medical benefits are taken out.

2. Annoying co-workers

Regardless of what anyone says, their is usually at least one person in the office that annoys their co-workers. You know the ones; the ones who ask you to buy their kids’ fundraiser items. The ones who are extremely long-winded. The ones who don’t respect personal space. The list goes on. Sorry if you’re an employee and you’re one of the people I just described.

3. Terrible work culture

Let’s face it. Nobody wants to spend 8+ hours each day in an environment that makes them want to pull out their hair or scream into a pillow at the end of the day. If you weren’t the boss and you had to work in the environment at your office, how might you feel? If your employees have negative attitudes, either something is going on in their personal lives, or there is a serious problem with the culture at work.

4. Physical workspace

Have you ever worked in an extremely hot or cold office? How about in a cramped workspace with malfunctioning computer systems? Let me tell you, neither one is fun, comfortable, or tolerable. People have quit jobs because the office was too cold. Workspace is highly important.

5. Management team

If the management team is mostly hands-off, condescending, or lazy, employees will have a hard time trusting their superiors and maintaining a strong work ethic. People tend to follow the example of their leaders. If the leaders aren’t leading by example, the people will become lazy and much less productive or responsive.

6. The company’s organization or lack thereof

This also falls on the management team. Disorganization is the best way to get your employees to fall into doing their own thing, while probably submitting their resumes to other more organized companies. Structure is needed in any environment where people are expected to work together. People complain about being thrown into situations and positions with no real direction or clear instruction. Don’t be that company.

 

Now that you understand your employees a little more (and now that you know what not to do) let’s dive into what you can do to create a positive work environment.

 

How to Create A Positive Work Environment

 

The atmosphere in any office is set from the top down. The owner and management staff must be the examples of what the culture of the company will be.

 

1. Operate from your why at all times

When the owner is heavily involved, the culture tends to stay pretty accurate to what it was intended to be. However, when more staff is hired, and management is put into place, the owner becomes a bit more removed. As a result, sometimes the new authoritative figures lose sight of the original vision, and become more focused on productivity than cultivating a positive work environment. Make your core values all about your why and make sure everyone knows that is what the company is about.

2. Make your first few hires about personality and integrity more so than talent

Of course, hire talented people who know the job well and who are willing to learn and grow. But focus on finding people who are the all-around right fit for your company, rather than settling for people who can get the job done but who don’t necessarily have all the qualities you’re looking for to become a member of your business family. Be very particular and strategic about your first few hires. They will help to set the atmosphere.

3. Take the time to groom your employees

Hiring employees is a major investment. In fact, payroll is the greatest expense to most businesses. If you’re going to invest your money into people, you should also invest your time and attention to make sure they have everything they need from you to do a great job.

4. Make it okay to fail and learn

Some workplaces put an emphasis on productivity and getting it right with a very small margin for error. While this can drive people to stay on top of their game, it can also cause stress and anxiety, if people are constantly concerned about possibly losing their job or losing an opportunity to advance.

5. Get to know your people and show them that you care

You’ll spend a good amount of time with your employees while grooming them and making yourself accessible to them. But you should also take the time to get to know them on a more personal level. This is how you cultivate relationships and show your employees that you are genuine and care for them. Doing this allows you to create loyal employees who want to stick around for the long haul.

6. Give the same things you expect

As I mentioned before, you should lead by example. If you expect a world of perfection from your employees, you should also give perfection. Show everyone how much you care about the work you do (and reiterate your why regularly) so that people will buy into the company’s vision and mission, and they will work hard for the logo.

I sincerely hope you understand what things you should implement immediately to reduce employee turnover and to build a positive work environment for your team. Good luck on your future in business.

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Founder & CEO at , Write Mind

Author of The Mask and Creator of The Write Mind Studio

Andriea Denise is an author, educator, and entrepreneur. She is the founder of The Write Mind Studio, and passionate about helping people to become the best versions of themselves and to live the lives they actively create.


  • 352
  • 891
  • 93
  • 1.5K
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  • 352
  • 891
  • 93
  • 1.5K
  •  
  •  
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